Managing Rainwater

Our region gets a lot of rain (an average of 38 inches per year) and while it’s an asset that supports everything from plants and wildlife to our economy and water supply, there can be too much of a good thing. When rain falls on forests, farms and natural areas it soaks into the ground, but when it lands on roofs, roads and parking lots it flows to storm drains and eventually the Tualatin River.

Rain Gardens

Bowl-shaped areas that soak up rainwater from roofs, driveways and lawns that are planted with native plants. Rain gardens fill with a few inches of rain that slowly filters into the ground, rather than running off into storm drains.

Rain Barrels

Rain barrels collect and store rainwater from your rooftop that would otherwise flow to storm drains and streams. You can use water from a rain barrel to water your lawn or garden, or to wash your car. Large collection systems, or cisterns, can store a substantial amount of water for use but also require a high level of expertise for installation.

Porous Pavers

Driveways, walking paths and patios made of materials that let rainwater soak through instead of running off.

Managing Rainwater

Our region gets a lot of rain (an average of 38 inches per year) and while it’s an asset that supports everything from plants and wildlife to our economy and water supply, there can be too much of a good thing. When rain falls on forests, farms and natural areas it soaks into the ground, but when it lands on roofs, roads and parking lots it flows to storm drains and eventually the Tualatin River.

As a result of climate change we’re experiencing more frequent and intense storms that can lead to high water and flooding, as well as increased runoff, pollution and erosion.

Your yard and driveway have the potential to soak up and slow down rainwater, filter pollutants and provide space for beneficial birds, bugs and bees.